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Tudor Row Houses – Part 2

Once the base and main street were complete (see part 1), it was time to move on to the first story of the buildings. I began by outlining the overall shape of the buildings.  I wanted to get a good idea of what the overall look of the project would look like.

IMG_4288I took the bottom portion of of this cutout and cut it off. The main floor of each building is made of stone, so the process here was similar to that of the canal wall: cut a piece of foamcore, mark out the doors and windows, strip the paper off the front and back, then add the stonework with a ball point pen. After the stonework was etched in, I added paint, then a layer of colored spackle for the mortar.

At this point I also completed the doors and first floor windows.  The doors are made of balsa textured with a wife brush and the painted.  The hinge straps are made of cardboard.  The window frames are also balsa, while the glass itself is made of a transparency that I photocopied a grid onto.

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From there it was time to tackle the second story of the corner building.  I wanted to create a more solid look to the corner posts of the building.  I started with a piece of balsa that I beveled the edges on, then textured with a wire brush.  I cut the piece of balsa to fit, then split the board about 2/3 of the way across.  Finally I took the smaller piece of wood and glued it onto the larger one to make a corner.

Re-attach
Re-attach
Start
Split
Split

 

Attach to walls
Attach to walls

Then I took the new corner and attached it to the foamcore wall along with others that I had made.

After that it was a matter of repeating the process for the remaining corners and adding more textured balsa for the other timbers and for the window frames.  Each piece of balsa gets beveled with a sharp knife to give it a rough hewn look

The windows of the same gridded trancperency.  I backed the transparency with  black construction paper.  I had cut both to be larger than the actual window, to make sure that I had enough to work with, then glued both to the surface of the foamcore wall.  Once in place, I glued the frames and other timbers right onto the surface of the transparency. This actually works quite well, the paper backing and the transparency reflect the light in such a way as to give a real sense of depth.  I am not ecstatic about the flatness of the photocopied lines as opposed to actual lead lining as would be in a real window of the period, but for cheap and easy, this solution is a good one.

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Adding windows, frames, and other timbers
Repeat on other walls and glue together
Repeat on other walls and glue together

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Daub in place
Daub in place

Following that it is a matter of repeating the process on the other walls and gluing them together to make the overall building.

The daub section between the timbers is made of sculptamold.  I make up about two teaspoons worth at a time and fill in the gaps.  I work carefully, trying not to get too much on the timbers (it can fill in the grain on the wood quite easily).  I make it as smooth as I can as I go, even the smoothest I can manage is a little rough.  As I go I also add cracks with a sculpting tool.  Just before it gets dry, I go back one more time and smooth it down.  That last go over really smooths out the sculptamold giving it just the “right” texture.

Next up: Main buildings, painting, roofing

 

 

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